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I, Daniel Blake (2016) Review

Whilst doing this review of Ken Loach’s I, Daniel Blake (2016), I was going to try and avoid the politics of this movie and focus on the film aspects of it. But to review this Palme d’Or Winner there is no way of avoiding the politics of the world that Ken Loach has created in this realistic film.





It sets up the world setting the life of Daniel Blake in a very doom and gloom state where he has been left behind in the world as it has all moved on ahead of him as shown by his neighbour that is trying to start a business online. His setback was a heart attack and means that he cannot work. However, he has been deemed fit for work by the system. Whilst he is trying to sort it out, he meets Katie, who has been rehoused with her 2 kids from London to Newcastle.


The film follows the pairs stories and Daniel takes Katie and her family under his wing and helps them to get their life in Newcastle sorted. Katie and her kids have to go to a food bank which is scene I genuinely hate to watch filmed from a distance she is so isolated and you can see that she is so hungry. She opens up a tin of beans and starts eating out of her hand. This is such an emotional scene to watch as Katie is fully stripped of her humanity and really shows how hard it is.


This film written by Paul Laverty fully delves into the system of the England and points out how it is failing people without holding back. A story combined with great performances by Dave Johns and Hayley Squires and cinematography almost of documentary nature with the very shallow depth of field really makes it a enjoyable but hard to watch film.

I rate this film 4.5/5.


#KenLoach #IDanielBlake #Film #Review

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